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COPTIC SOLDIERS AND OFFICERS OF THE COPTIC LEGION – GERMAN FIGURINES

August 23, 2015

Coptic Legion German

In previous articles, I shared drawing, paintings and figurines of the Coptic Legion that fought the Mamelukes and Ottomans in Egypt in 1799-1801, and then fought with the French Army in its European Napoleonic wars. I would like to add today, some German figurines (flat tins) of the Coptic Legion which were sold recently on eBay. They are twelve pieces (30mm each) of Coptic soldiers and officers; with a drummer and one cavalry officer. They all wear their distinctive uniform which I wrote about before. Above is the lot.

THE BOHAIRIC CATHOLIC EPISTLES, ACTS OF THE APOSTLES AND THE APOCALYPSE, EDITED BY GEORGE WILLIAM HORNER

August 23, 2015

In previous articles I put up links for Volume 1, 2 and 3 of The Coptic version of the New Testament in the northern dialect otherwise called Memphitic and Bohairic : with introduction, critical apparatus, and literal English translation, which were edited by the Coptologist and Biblical scholar George William Horner (1849 – 1930) in 1898 and 1905.

Here, I would like to put up a link to Volume 4, the last of them on the Bohairic New Testament, which he published in 1905 (with Volume 3), and included in it:

  1. The Catholic Epistles (edited from Ms. Oriental 424)
  • The Epistle of Saint James
  • The First Epistle of Saint Peter
  • The Second Epistle of Saint Peter
  • The First Epistle of Saint John
  • The Second Epistle of Saint John
  • The Third Epistle of Saint John
  • The Epistle of Saint Jude
  1. The Acts of the Apostles (edited also from Ms. Oriental 424)
  2. The Apocalypse (edited from Ms. Curzon 128)

THE BOHAIRIC EPISTLES OF SAINT PAUL, EDITED BY GEORGE WILLIAM HORNER

August 23, 2015

In a previous article, I put up links for Volume 1 and 2 of The Coptic version of the New Testament in the northern dialect otherwise called Memphitic and Bohairic : with introduction, critical apparatus, and literal English translation, which were edited by the Coptologist and Biblical scholar George William Horner (1849 – 1930) in 1898.

Here, I would like to put up a link to Volume Three, which he published in 1905, and included in it the Epistles of Saint Paul (edited from Ms. Oriental 424 in the British museum):

THE BOHAIRIC COPTIC GOSPELS, EDITED BY GEORGE WILLIAM HORNER

August 23, 2015

George William Horner (1849 – 1930) was a Coptologist and biblical scholar. He collected many Coptic manuscripts, edited them, and published them with English translation.

He published the New Testament, in both Bohairic (also called Memphitic) and Sahidic, in addition to other Coptic books. Horner started off by editing the Bohairic New Testament from 1898 to 1905. He did that in four volumes. Here, I would like to put links to the Four Gospels in Bohairic, which he included in the first two volumes (both, like his other works, were published in Oxford at the Clarendon Press: Volume 1 and 2 in 1898):

Volume One: The Coptic version of the New Testament in the northern dialect otherwise called Memphitic and Bohairic : with introduction, critical apparatus, and literal English translation. This volume, which was edited from MS. Huntington 17 in the Bodleian Library, included:

Volume Two: The Coptic version of the New Testament in the northern dialect otherwise called Memphitic and Bohairic : with introduction, critical apparatus, and literal English translation. This volume, again was edited from MS. Huntington 17 in the Bodleian Library, and included:

THE COPTIC NEW TESTAMENT GOSPELS, PUBLICATION BY SAINT SHENOUDA THE ARCHIMANDRITE COPTIC SOCIETY

August 22, 2015

Gospels

The Saint Shenouda the Archimandrite Coptic Society, a group of Coptic scholars, has recently published its The Coptic New Testament Gospels, and made it available online. The reader can find it here. This is undoubtedly a great achievement, as it collects the four Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John written in Bohairic, Old Bohairic, Sahidic, and Lycopolitan in one volume, and puts against each, in a parallel column, the corresponding in other dialects, and in Greek and English. No Coptic language scholar, I suspect, will not find this volume, which is nearly 3000 pages long, of assistance. It will also benefit those who are interested in studying the English and Greek Gospels further.

It is good that the publishers used Western numerals rather than the Coptic ones, which I think cannot survive if we want to modernise Coptic, in this publication. The Coptic font is graceful, modern, and easy on the eye. The publication, however, has a few minor defects, such as the mistakes in the contents page at the beginning, some problems in the Coptic script, and the occasional failure to label the corresponding column rightly. Another defect is that the pages are not numbered. One hopes that these mistakes are amended in their new online edition; and one hopes that they will make it available online in other formats other than the PDF.

Let us hope also that the society will publish the rest of the New Testament and also the Old Testament. Such sources in Coptic have enormous influence on the progress of the study of Coptic.

gospel of Matthew

The Gospel of St. Matthew occupies pages 10 to 900, and includes:

  • Bohairic – Greek
  • Bohairic – English (KJV)
  • Bohairic – Middle Egyptian
  • Bohairic – Sahidic
  • Greek – English (KJV)
  • Middle Egyptian – Greek
  • Middle Egyptian – English (KJV)
  • Sahidic – Greek
  • Sahidic – English (KJV)
  • Sahidic – Middle Egyptian

gospel of mark

The Gospel of St. Mark occupies the pages from 901 to 1225, and includes:

  • Bohairic – Greek
  • Bohairic – English (KJV)
  • Bohairic – Sahidic
  • Greek – English (KJV)
  • Sahidic – Greek
  • Sahidic – English (KJV)

gospel of luke

The Gospel of Luke occupies the pages 1226 to 1782, and includes:

  • Bohairic – Greek
  • Bohairic – English (KJV)
  • Bohairic – Sahidic
  • Greek – English (KJV)
  • Sahidic – Greek
  • Sahidic – English (KJV)

gospel of john

Gospel of St. John occupies the pages 1783 to 1833, and includes:

  • Bohairic – Greek
  • Bohairic – English (KJV)
  • Bohairic – Lycopolitan
  • Bohairic – Old Bohairic
  • Bohairic – Sahidic
  • Greek – English (KJV)
  • Lycopolitan – Greek
  • Lycopolitan – English (KJV)
  • Old Bohairic – Greek
  • Old Bohairic – English (KJV)
  • Old Bohairic – Lycopolitan
  • Sahidic – Greek
  • Sahidic – English (KJV)
  • Sahidic – Lycopolitan
  • Sahidic – Old Bohairic

SAINT FRACIS OF ASSISI ICON USING COPTIC ICONOGRAPHY TECHNIQUE BY THE FRENCH ARTIST, KATIA-LAURE LEFEVRE-MININNO

August 14, 2015

francis2

Sanctus Franciscus Assisiensis by the French artist, Katia-Laure Lefevre-Mininno

Modern Coptic iconography, as established by Isaac Fanous (1919 – 2007), has established itself within the Copts and internationally, particularly in the West. It is not just widely appreciated now by Western artists and art critics but its technique is being used by many of them. We have, as an example, the French artist, Katia-Laure Lefevre-Mininno, from Rennes, France, who after a period of Greek iconography shifted to Coptic iconography, in her own words, because of its “simplicity combined with sensitivity”. The reader can find more about Lefevre-Mininno here and here.

Lefevre-Mininno has painted several icons in the Coptic way, depicting traditional Christian figures as one finds in Coptic Orthodoxy. I, however, have been intrigued by a Coptic icon made by her of Saint Francis the Assisi, who is revered in the Catholic Church. The icon depicts the Catholic saint in the characteristic lines and colours, and with “simplicity and sensitivity”, that the Coptic saints are depicted in in Coptic iconography. I think it is great.

HOLY FAMILY IN EGYPT COPTIC ICON BY ARTISTS, BEDOUR LATIF AND YOUSSEF NASSEIF

August 14, 2015

Coptic icon holy family egypt2

Holy Family in Egypt, Coptic icon by Bedour Latif and Youssef Nasseif, 1988

I share with my readers this beautiful Coptic icon of the Holy Family in Egypt by the two Coptic artists, Bidour Latif and Youssef Nasseif, which they painted in 1988. Coptic iconographers prefer to describe their work as writing rather than drawing and painting, for an icon is a statement of religion full of symbolic meanings: the Christian viewer can look at an icon and read what it says and what it teaches him. Here is the little Holy Family with Salome, the Virgin’s midwife according to Coptic tradition, sitting in an Egyptian papyrus boat that is sailing on the River Nile, with some fish swimming in blue water around the boat and towards the Family as if paying homage to it, and escorting it. The Holy Family is also surrounded by interested white pigeons, common in Egypt, and guarded by an angel spreading his arms as if saying to us, “Behold, the Holy Family”. Jesus is possibly two years old here, and is dressed in a white long tunic; and stands in the boat while his mother, the Virgin Mary, securing him with her two hands. In the background one sees the lotus plants, plenty of palm trees bearing ripe red dates, and two Egyptian temples. Strangely, the Nile wave lines run longitudinal to the Nile and not transversely, contrary to Ancient Egyptian/Coptic tradition.

No one will fail to see Egypt or the Holy Family in Egypt in this beautiful icon.

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